It’s Time to Ditch the Robot

Lately, my phone has been beeping incessantly with automated direct messages from new people I’m following on Twitter. The messages typically say things like “hey, thanks for following and please check out my blog”.
 Today, I decided I’ve had enough and I turned off SMS notifications for Twitter.

Essentially, automated direct messages on Twitter are like e-mail spam – I don’t want them, they clog up my “inbox” and they take away from the messages that matter. These messages only think about the sender and not about the recipient. It’s all about getting more visitors to their blog or encouraging people to check out their product. These overt sales tactics do nothing but turn people off.

Do you want to have a relationship with a robot? Neither do I. Social media is about personal relationships. It’s about connecting with people, creating a dialogue and communicating ideas. When this goes away, social media is pointless.

To many, social media is about attracting a large number of followers. I disagree. Quality trumps quantity any day of the week for me. I would much rather have 300 engaged followers than 30,000 followers who have never communicated with me. Do I appreciate the people that follow me? Sure I do. But, I don’t use an automated message to let people know that. I send them an @reply, strike up a conversation and follow people back if I find them interesting. In my mind, that’s certainly better than sending a generic message encouraging people to check out my blog.

Am I saying that direct messages on Twitter are not useful? No. I think that direct messages can be a great way to communicate with people about things the whole world doesn’t need to see. Want to meet me for coffee? Send me a DM. Want to thank me for following you? Ditch the robot.

What do you think about automated direct messages? Do you think they are useful or are they just spam?

Image credit: Swansea Photographer

Today, I decided to turn off SMS notifications for Twitter. In other words, I no longer get text messages every time I get a direct message on Twitter. My phone has been beeping incessantly with automated direct messages from new people I’m following. The messages typically say things like “hey, thanks for following and please check out my blog”. Today, I decided I’ve had enough.

Essentially, automated direct messages are like e-mail spam – I don’t want them, they clog up my “inbox” and they take away from the messages that matter. These messages only think about the sender and not about the recipient. It’s all about getting more visitors to their blog or encouraging people to check out their product. These overt sales tactics do nothing but turn people off.

Do you want to have a relationship with a robot? Neither do I. Social media is about personal relationships. It’s about connecting with people, creating a dialogue and communicating ideas. When this goes away, social media is pointless.

To many, social media is about attracting a large number of followers. I disagree. Quality trumps quantity any day of the week for me. I would much rather have 300 engaged followers than 30,000 followers who have never communicated with me. Do I appreciate the people that follow me? Sure I do. But, I don’t use an automated message to let people know that. I send them an @reply, strike up a conversation and follow people back if I find them interesting. In my mind, that’s certainly better than sending a generic message encouraging people to check out my blog.

Am I saying that direct messages on Twitter are not useful? No. I think that direct messages can be a great way to communicate with people about things the whole world doesn’t need to see. Want to meet me for coffee? Send me a DM. Want to thank me for following you? Ditch the robot.

What do you think about automated direct messages? Do you think they are useful or are they just spam?

Share This Post

Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email
Laura Click

Laura Click

Laura Click is brand strategist, speaker, podcaster and the founder of Blue Kite. Learn more about Laura and her work at Blue Kite.

3 replies on “It’s Time to Ditch the Robot”

Great point, Laura! I agree that some of these fabulous uses of technology are begin crowded by businesses pushing products. It makes me think of how frustrating FB is to read these days for the obnoxious apps that are supposed to make life better. Great post!

Great post, Laura! I agree with all your points.

Some direct messages are so obviously automatic and sales-y that it makes me regret the follow. Of course I understand the need to promote ones own blog (I have a blog), but I’d rather have someone connect with me first before pushing me to their site. I’m more likely to subscribe to their blog that way anyways! Social media isn’t about the push.

Best,
Tegan

Great points!

Tegan – You’re right. When people promote themselves too much, it tends to have the opposite effect in social media, and in real life. No one likes people who only talk about themselves.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

We thought you might like these

Business & Entrepreneurship

3 Guiding Principles for 2020

Total2 0 0 0 2I hope your 2020 is off to a great start! Mine started off a little bumpy with some illness, but I’m