4 Reasons You Should Push the Pause Button on Your Blog

It’s possible I’m going to cause a riot here. In fact, in writing this post, I’m going against something I believe in strongly – blog post regularity.

I think posting regularly keeps your blog viable. It’s like in-person relationships, most fade when not nurtured on a regular basis.

However, sometimes consistency can be a blog killer. Rotely sharing posts because you “have to” is not the way to create a vibrate community or add benefit to your readers. In fact, it will have just the opposite effect.

If you can’t keep your readers attention or write posts that will get them to stop what they’re doing and read what you have to say, then perhaps you shouldn’t bother.

Yes, it’s true that most successful bloggers are consistent. However, they also know when they need to pull back.

With this post, I’m officially giving you license to push the pause button on your blog every once and while.

Here are four reasons you need to may need to consider taking a short break on your blog for the benefit of your readers AND your business:

1. Your posts are lifeless.

People can smell a forced post a mile away. It reeks of mediocrity and lacks imagination. If you aren’t “feeling it”, then your readers won’t either.

Yesterday, Mack Collier talked about how business blogs would be a lot more exciting if people injected some passion into it. He’s right.

If you are phoning in your blog posts, it might be time to stop and readjust your strategy.

Step away from the computer and seek some inspiration. Look for it in unusual places or don’t even focus on it at all. Sometimes, a killer blog post can come to mind when you’re not forcing it.

And, if you’re still coming up empty, here are some blog post ideas to help get your creative juices flowing.

2. Blogging isn’t helping your business.

Blogs can be a great way to get your business noticed online, build a community of support and even drive sales. However, if your blog isn’t helping you move the needle for your business, it might be worth pulling back momentarily to adjust.

Take a look at your goals and see what worked and where things are falling short. Brainstorm some ideas of things you can do differently to help you get
 the results you’re after.

And, if you’re not sure how to improve your blog, ask your readers. Not only is this a great way to involve your audience, but it will help you deliver information that they will find useful and entertaining.

3. You have more important priorities.

As a business owner, you have to be adept at juggling priorities. But sometimes, your plate can just get too full.

If you have a big project that you need to focus on or a looming deadline, you might need to take a short break on your blog. Get through your big project and then work on getting back on track. You can’t let your blog get in the way of doing the things that are going to be the biggest benefit to your business.

4. Life gets in the way.

Sometimes, life has a funny way of getting in the way of our blogs and our businesses. Maybe you have a family emergency or you have an important life event that takes place.

Don’t sweat it. Life happens. Your blog will live on. The bottom line is that you shouldn’t let your blog get in the way of the things that matter most to you, like your family or friends.

How do you get back on track?

If you want to have a successful blog, then it’s important to quickly get back in the habit of blogging.
 A break from blogging is only devastating if it’s permanent.

Here are a few things you can do to get back on track with your blog:

  • Don’t beat yourself up. Everyone has missed a blog post before. Even me. If you get knocked off your schedule, just dust off your chaps and get back on that blogging horse.
  • Forget the excuses. No one wants to hear where you’ve been or why you’ve neglected to blog. The old “sorry I haven’t posted for a while” line just won’t cut it. Just get back in there and provide interesting, useful content for your readers. That way, your readers welcome you back with open arms.
  • Set a realistic schedule. Be honest with yourself about how often you can blog moving forward. Start slowly with one post a week or even a couple of posts a month and then build from there. Starting small makes it easier for you to stay on track.
  • Develop a habit. In addition to setting a schedule for posting to your blog,
     you should also set a schedule for writing. Get in the habit of writing regularly or setting aside designated time to write. You’ll find it’s harder to quit blogging if it’s ingrained into your schedule.
  • Plan ahead. If you know there are projects or life events that are going to get in the way of your blog, plan ahead. Line up some guests posts or have a couple of evergreen posts handy that you can use in an emergency. By planning ahead, you won’t lose any momentum you’ve built with your blog.

What do you think? Is it ever okay to take a break from blogging? If so, how do you get back on track?

Image credit: Eran Finkle

Share This Post

Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email
Laura Click

Laura Click

Laura Click is brand strategist, speaker, podcaster and the founder of Blue Kite. Learn more about Laura and her work at Blue Kite.

17 replies on “4 Reasons You Should Push the Pause Button on Your Blog”

This is a great thought, Laura. I agree that sometimes pulling back, taking a big, deep breath, and stepping away from the computer can make a world of difference. The only thing I would add is that sometimes a good way to give you a break is to let some of your readers guest post. That way, you are still building your community, your readers are seeing new things, and you may just get inspired by one of those guest posts you get!

Great points. If you’re head isn’t in the game, it really shows in your posts. I agree – guest posting is a GREAT way to give yourself a break without letting your blog suffer.

Hi Laura…I think you and I are on the same path here! It is soooo difficult to maintain both a successful, thriving business and a successful, thriving blog ALL the time. It’s really difficult and in my case, something usually has to slide and I can tell you that it will NOT be the business. And yes, I have ‘dialed in’ a post and boy did I regret it. Better to not post at all, or as @MargieClayman:disqus mentions, ask for guest posters. I’ve started doing that lately, but don’t yet have them in the queue. Add to that my guests posts for other blogs and I’ve just upped the posting schedule. Balance. Focus. Goals. Those are good parameters for anything, but for blogging while in business, they’re vital. Hope you don’t mind, I might be jumping off this post to write another…

Thanks for stopping by, Erica. You hit the nail on the head. I think we all suffer from overwhelm and managing the monster we created. As we all know, we could spend all day blogging and commenting and sharing on social media sites. The key is to keep your goals in mind, set boundaries around your activities so you can remain focus. You’re right – blogging is an important tool for fleshing out ideas, attracting new business and building a community, but at the end of the day, serving your current clients is the most important thing of all.

Well said!

Thanks for stopping by, Erica. You hit the nail on the head. I think we all suffer from overwhelm and managing the monster we created. As we all know, we could spend all day blogging and commenting and sharing on social media sites. The key is to keep your goals in mind, set boundaries around your activities so you can remain focus. You’re right – blogging is an important tool for fleshing out ideas, attracting new business and building a community, but at the end of the day, serving your current clients is the most important thing of all.

Well said!

Thanks for stopping by, Erica. You hit the nail on the head. I think we all suffer from overwhelm and managing the monster we created. As we all know, we could spend all day blogging and commenting and sharing on social media sites. The key is to keep your goals in mind, set boundaries around your activities so you can remain focus. You’re right – blogging is an important tool for fleshing out ideas, attracting new business and building a community, but at the end of the day, serving your current clients is the most important thing of all.

Well said!

Hi Laura,

I agree with most everything you said here as I too feel the same way about posting consistently and frequently and whatever else. Yes, those things are in fact important – but, they should be taken with a grain of salt.

If you don’t have anything to say on a particular day – then you don’t have to. I would actually ask that you spare us and say nothing at all! Silence is often golden. It’s for this same reason that I don’t have a set blog posting schedule. I have to series that are very regular (every Wed. & Sun.) but in between I post whenever the heck I’m inspired. Forcing yourself to just say something for the sake of saying it will affect the quality of your blog.

Life, work and friends get in the way of our blogging and thank goodness for that!

For the most part – people aren’t dumb. If the community you’ve worked so hard to build starts to notice crap, they’ll call you on it!

I often use the example of bloggers such as Glen Allsopp who posts once in a blue moon but still manages to captivate and retain his audience with every word.

With every article I publish I ask myself – do I like it? Would I want to read it? Is it entertaining all while providing some kind of useful or valuable material for my audience (that I know and actively engage with)? And will they be inspired enough to want to join the conversation and add their thoughts in the comments or what I call my little version of “Central Perk” lol ;).

I actually wrote an entire post about just this topic (rather humorous) a little while back. It’s called “Crap, I Have Nothing to Post” – but I’m not big on shameless self-promotion LOL so if you would like to give it a read, I’d be happy to send you the direct link.

Great write up and I’m glad I discovered your blog today – thanks to @MargieClayman:disqus latest #30 Thursday roundup post. Speaking of Margie – she makes a great point about inviting your readers to guest post. It’s something that I will be opening my blog up to in the near future but of course – I will want to make sure that whatever I decide to publish is in tune with the style and theme of my blog in general – for much the same reasons as I mentioned above.

It seems I’ve left you with a novel here so I’ll stop now – but then again – I tend do that when something or someone inspires me enough :).

Have a great week.
Cheers

Hi Ingrid,

Thanks for stopping by and sharing your wonderful insight – I appreciate it! I think a lot of businesses and bloggers struggle with this – quality vs. quantity. Certainly, quality is the most important, but it’s hard to gain traction without quantity…or, at least consistency.

I think Glenn Allsopp is a GREAT example of an sporadic blogger that does well. I’d argue he’s the exception, not the rule. I think it’s hard to get your name out there if you’re only going to blog once in a blue moon. It’s a delicate balance for sure.

Glad I inspired you enough to stop by and share you thoughts. I really do appreciate it! Glad to meet you and I look forward to talking with you more.

Have a good one!

Oh, and yes, I would LOVE to see that “Crap, I have nothing to post’ article. Send me the link!

 Laura,

How perfect of a topic for me to read tonight. Thank goodness for Ms. Griddy and her SuperPost otherwise I might not have had the opportunity to get over here. I’ve been ‘beating’ myself up lately over my seeming inability to sit down (time constraints) and compose a publish worthy post. My blog feels neglected. It’s got dust building up all over it, and the longer I wait, the harder it seems to ignite the inspiration to get back on there. But I am going to, and your post certainly helps me realize that there are times when anything and everything, no matter how important, will be
 superseded
 by other
 priorities.
 

Thanks.

Hi James,

Thanks for stopping by! I’m glad you found this through
 @nittygriddyblog:twitter’s awesome roundup.

I think there’s a lot of burnout going around the blogosphere lately. Maybe it’s contagious?! Anyway, I think that you’re not alone in the feelings of guilt when you don’t post. I feel it too. But, I think your readers want to see good stuff from you instead of half-hearted content.
 

I think blogging is a lot like physical activity – bodies in motion, stay in motion, bodies at rest, stay at rest. The same is true for blogging. It’s hard to stop the momentum once you have it going. But, once you do stop, it can be awfully hard to get back in gear. The first one back is always the hardest. But, just rip the bandaid off and do it. You’ll be back in the routine in no time!

Good luck!

Great post, Laura. I think Michael Hyatt has a great way of taking a break from blogging. He announces a
 sabbatical
 or fast from all social media, with a beginning and end date. That way his readers know he will be back, and in the meantime can contribute by commenting on existing posts. Just going away without a message can be detrimental, since many people will feel you have abandoned the blog.

Hi John – Thanks for stopping by my blog. Yes, you’re right –
 @michaelhyatt:twitter
 does a great job in handling breaks from his blog. He is certainly an example of a blogger to follow. Having people guest post on your blog is also a great way to give yourself a breather, while also keeping fresh, new content on the blog.
 

I love this way of thinking because it doesn’t make the “rule always post regularly” but it looks at the symptoms in both the blog itself and the reader. Taking a break is fine… so long as you are not just “getting lazy”

I believe it’s all about the purpose of the blog… and if it is not achieving those purposes you need t change something…

Oh… and I blog everyday… pretty much everyday for the last two and a half years… need a break? Maybe…

Thanks for the comment, Geoff. You’re right – there’s a difference between taking a planned break and simply slacking off. It’s really easy to lose momentum when you take a break. Suddenly, a week off turns into two or three…

The trick is to be intentional with your approach, even your breaks. But, that’s often easier said than done. It’s amazing how many dormant blogs there are sitting around out there.

Kudos to you for blogging every day! Sounds like it’s cathartic for you!

Boy is my personal blog ever dusty. It’s just too easy to make excuses about why you’re not going to write or post, but I like that you spotlight the fact, well, if you’re in the position to make excuses, probably anything you post won’t wind up being too worthwhile or relevant to your blog’s personality.
 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

We thought you might like these

Business & Entrepreneurship

3 Guiding Principles for 2020

Total2 0 0 0 2I hope your 2020 is off to a great start! Mine started off a little bumpy with some illness, but I’m